24
Leave a Reply

avatar
7 Comment threads
17 Thread replies
4 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
14 Comment authors
DaibChrisValiranChris BradshawNathan Ridgway Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Chris
Guest
Chris

Supports my theory that a destroyer could probably pack in double the complement just by holding and additional fighter group in the servicing positions on the racks. Probably Triple or more if they filled the assault deck with fighters sitting on their wings. Similar to how a modern super carrier can carry additional fighter on it’s deck.

Nathan Ridgway
Guest

This is 72. I thought a single TIE/ln wing was 144. Did I read that wrong?

Cdr. Rajh
Guest
Cdr. Rajh

72 is the complement of an Imperial Star Destroyer, I would assume the reason for having 72 was to test how much space a fully loaded TIE complement on an Impstar would look like on his racks

Nathan Ridgway
Guest

Ah. Got it.

StarkillerXI
Guest
StarkillerXI

And this is why Vultures will always be superior to Ties. No pilot, no boarding hassle, no loss of life. Just highly effective programmable killing machines that store easily.

Ryadra777
Guest

There is the TIE Droid that is also an unmanned fighter.

StarkillerXI
Guest
StarkillerXI

It’s a start. Droids are the ultimate answer, I’d give the Tie Interceptor a droid brain, and for storage it’d hang facing down from the ceiling on racks similar to Fractal’s. It’d be loaded via tractorbeam after landing in the hanger. Pilots shouldn’t be that expendable, too much time to retrain new ones. Instead have pilots remote control Tie Defender drones with shields, and the best pilots into Tie Advanced X1s equipped with modular loadouts and hyperdrive.

gorkmalork
Guest
gorkmalork

I do have to wonder about their performance (and the control ship’s gunners, granted) against a measly half-squad of N-1s in TPM. Granted, a main-character Forcemonkey du jour was involved, but Jedi/Sith probability-tweaking rarely seems to benefit anyone else in a battle unless they’re making a dedicated effort.

PhantomFury
Guest
PhantomFury

I don’t know about highly effective though. While having reflexes unmatched by non-Force sensitive organics, droids in Star Wars have a tendency to lack situation awareness unless you let that develop over time through lack of memory wipes. But lack of memory wipes equals dangerous, unpredictable droids.

gorkmalork
Guest
gorkmalork

Now that you mention memory wipes, there’s also the issue of full-AI droids resenting such treatment-and really, artificial sapients should be volunteers rather than draftees in the first place, though of course the Empire gives not a solitary kriff. Avengers or Defenders with R2D2-level experience (and the proper incentives) could be a palpable step up from what we see CIS snubs manage.

Chris Bradshaw
Guest
Chris Bradshaw

I suppose the conclusion of this line of thinking is Dark Empire’s Shadow Droids, but that’s a little edgy for my tastes.

gorkmalork
Guest
gorkmalork

To say nothing of the aesthetic loss even compared to barebones World Devastator-spammed TIE drones. Sad thing is, they’d fit right into the ST’s paradigm (especially with some walker-scale wingtip lightsabers).

Valiran
Guest
Valiran

Edgy, yes, but they also make perfect sense as something that a man like Palpatine would create to take over the galaxy.

StarkillerXI
Guest
StarkillerXI

That could be possible. The CIS lacked a central AI. Therefore droids died, and learning from those deaths was impossible. However, with an AI even as sentient as R2D2 connected to each unit, every death would be a growth in learning. They’d evolve. And droids were by no means useless. Trifighters and Vultures were arguably much better than their counter parts. They were able to manuever in ways that would kill a sentient, and did not question orders. At the end of the day, total cost per unit should involve the cost in training a new pilot. Droids need no… Read more »

gorkmalork
Guest
gorkmalork

Given the existence of inertial compensators (which, at least according to the old X-wing books, can *totally* neutralize G-force effects on organic pilots), the maneuver-survival point seems a bit moot. Dedicated droid fighters might be good for saving space and/or life-support costs, but taking AIs (especially *drafted* AIs) totally off the leash might backfire colossally.

Valiran
Guest
Valiran

Star Wars generally fails at droid programming. Any dedicated combat droid should be perfectly at ease with the idea of getting destroyed in battle without being suicidal. Ideally, every surviving droid would also upload its memories into a database that sends them out to the rest of the droids in the fleet, so they gain combat experience much more quickly.

Daib
Guest
Daib

And that’s how you get Skynet to turn against you.

It’s not that they can’t make a lethal self-learning AI, but rather that they know not to. Anything beyond a certain intelligence range is pretty much guaranteed to go off the rails.

Jonarus_Drakus
Guest

That… Is a LOT of eyeballs…

~JD

PhantomFury
Guest
PhantomFury

Would the pilot board the TIE somewhere in the back of the hangar first before getting moved to launch position or will there be a catwalk and retractable ladder system between the rails? The former does allow for variable sizes of craft that this system is designed for.

PhoenixKnight
Guest
PhoenixKnight

Wow

Cdr. Rajh
Guest
Cdr. Rajh

Ah, a full Impstar complement~ Interesting